Author Topic: Identify Different Connectors for A+ Essentials Exam  (Read 3785 times)

Offline certforumz

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Identify Different Connectors for A+ Essentials Exam
« on: February 12, 2013, 03:36:15 AM »
There are variety of connectors in USB itself, most important are types USB 2.0 and USB  3.0. Under each category, you have USB Type A and Type B, USB Mini Type A and Type B; and USB Micro Type A and Type B.  Mainly, the difference between different types (Normal, Mini, and Micro) is that they differ in the size and shape. USB Micro connectors are primarily used in mobile devices such as handheld phones, tablets, etc.

USB 2.0: Released in April 2000. Added higher maximum signaling rate of 480 Mbit/s (effective throughput up to 35 MB/s or 280 Mbit/s) (now called "Hi-Speed").
USB 3.0 was released in November 2008. The standard claims a theoretical "maximum" transmission speed of up to 5 Gbit/s (625 MB/s). USB 3.0 reduces the time required for data transmission, reduces power consumption, and is backward compatible with USB 2.0.

 Know the following connectors well:

1. USB Connectors
  • a. USB 2.0 Type A


    Type A connectors are characterized by a wide and flat rectangle shape. They are easily recognized since they are the connection for USB flash drives as well as printers, scanners and similar devices. Its flat contacts help to keep it plugged in and it is outfitted with an inner plastic component to help guide users to insert it at the proper orientation. They connect to computers or hubs, supplying a downstream link.

  • b. USB 2.0 Type B


    The Type B USB plug has a thicker, somewhat rounded square shape. It stays inserted into a socket with the help of the friction from its contacts. Type B connectors plug into devices (such as printers, scanners, etc.) to load data or power.

  • c. USB 2.0 Type Mini A


  • d. USB2.0  Type Mini B

  • e. USB Type Micro A

  • f. USB Type Micro B


    Micro-USB connectors had been announced just months before Mini-A and Mini-AB connectors were no longer certified. These connectors became very popular. A Micro-USB A connector handles high speed transfers and On-The-Go for smartphones, digital cameras, GPS devices and more. It can withstand more wear and tear than a Mini plug.

        A Micro-USB B plug gives an upstream connection for small portable devices.

USB 3.0 SuperSpeed Connectors: Lastly, there are the basic USB 3.0 connectors with male only plugs:  USB 3.0 Type A, Type B and Micro-B connectors. The Type A USB 3.0 connector looks similar to its 2.0 counterpart with a flat, wide connector that points to the computer or hub. Its downstream capabilities work not only with a SuperSpeed interface, but also with USB 2.0 and 1.1. By appearance, these connectors are colored with blue markings to distinguish them for users.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2017, 07:48:59 AM by certforumz »

Offline certforumz

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Re: Identify Different Connectors for A+ Essentials Exam - RJ-11 and RJ-45
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2013, 05:21:23 AM »
SATA Connector: Serial ATA (SATA) is an IDE standard for connecting devices like optical drives and hard drives to the motherboard. SATA cables are long, thin, 7-pin cables. One end plugs into a port on the motherboard, usually labeled SATA, and the other into the back of a storage device like a hard drive. SATA replaces Parallel ATA as the IDE standard of choice for connecting storage drives inside of a computer. SATA storage devices can transmit data over twice as fast as an otherwise similar PATA device.



eSATA Connector: eSATA is used to connect a computer to an external hard drive or external optical drive; this method offers much higher transfer rates between devices as compared to USB 2.0, but these devices typically require a standalone power supply. Maximum Theoretical Speed is 3 Gbps.

« Last Edit: October 10, 2017, 07:49:34 AM by certforumz »


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Re: Identify Different Connectors for A+ Essentials Exam - HDMI Connectors
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2013, 07:27:48 AM »
High Definition Multimedia Interface, or HDMI, is an all-digital connector that can carry high-definition video and several digital audio channels all on the one cable. HDMI was first officially unveiled in 2003, but it's only in the last few years that we've seen widespread support for the standard.

Version 1.4 is the product's biggest update since HDMI was released, and introduces a host of new features and a modified cable design.

The big new feature is HDMI Ethernet which allows a two-way 100Mb connection to pass between two compatible components and means you will no longer need to wire your system up with LAN cables as well. However, Ethernet is an optional feature and not all version 1.4 cables support it — look for cables marked "-E" or "with Ethernet".

The 1.4 standard also supports 3D in full 1080p resolution — version 1.3 only supports 1080i — and resolutions up to 4K/2K (3840/2160p).

The new version allows for an audio return channel which is especially handy for television viewers. If you're watching your television's on-board tuner it means you can now hear it through your sound system with just the single cable — no need for a separate optical cable.

Given below are the HDMI Connectors:




« Last Edit: October 10, 2017, 07:50:41 AM by certforumz »